Why does cut of a diamond matter?

Why does cut of a diamond matter? When diamonds emerge from the earth, they are rough and unrefined. It takes numerous hours of cutting to turn a rough diamond into the beautiful stone as we know it. The cut grade is our primary consideration when making our stone selections. The fire in a diamond is not ignited without proper cutting proportions. The cut shows brilliance, dispersion and scintillation. As she begins to gaze deep into the soul of this diamond something may be missing without it, no matter the size (Carat Weight) of the diamond or how colorless (Color) or how clear (Clarity) it may be. To get a little more technical…only when comparing two diamonds of identical Cut grade should the individual components of Cut (such as girdle width, symmetry, polish, depth%, table%, and culet size) be used as further refinements or tie breakers.  Be aware …of diamond sellers who assign their own cut grades against the G I A grade. Many popular websites and retail stores display their own, making a more generous cut rating that can result in an inflated value. Cut descriptions from a GIA Cut grade Excellent Maximum fire and brilliance. Reflects nearly all of the light that enters the diamond, creating exceptional sparkle and life. Very Good Properly reflects most of the light that enters the diamond, producing superior fire and brilliance. Under normal lighting conditions, appears very similar to excellent cut, but for a lower price. Good Reflects a majority of the light that enters the diamond, for an above average appearance. An excellent value compared to higher cut grades. Fair Allows...
THE TRUTH ABOUT DIAMONDS

THE TRUTH ABOUT DIAMONDS

What is a diamond certificate? A diamond certificate, also called a diamond grading report or diamond quality document, is a report created by a team of gemologists. A completed certificate includes an analysis of the diamond’s dimensions, clarity, color, polish, symmetry, and other characteristics. Also many round diamonds, due to their popularity and brilliance, will also include a cut grade on the report. A diamond certificate is an expert third party opinion. The diamond is evaluated, measured, and scrutinized using trained eyes, a jeweler’s loupe, a microscope, and other industry tools.  It states the quality of the certified diamonds. Why is it important to have a diamond graded with a lab certificate? The jeweler is the seller.  Without the certificate (graded by a 3rd party) you are left to trust the jeweler’s estimates. This can cause a potential conflict because it can come down to a difference of opinion resulting in an inaccurate grade and possibly overpaying.  All certificates are not created equal.  There a lot of diamond laboratories out in the market. There are even documents that have been laminated and have fancy folders with them. Keep in mind some may be inaccurate and not graded by GIA standards. The certificate may state a certain grade but if it is not from GIA there is a good chance this may be inaccurate and potentially result in over paying for the stone.  Why G.I.A? The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) is the most respected laboratory in the diamond industry.  Its world-wide presence stands on its consistency and unbiased diamond grading system.  Diamonds accompanied by GIA’s grading reports and certificates...
Topaz

Topaz

Precious topaz is a birthstone for November and blue topaz is a birthstone for December. Blue topaz is the gem of the 4th anniversary and Imperial topaz is the gem of the 23rd anniversary. Topaz is a gemstone available in a rich rainbow of colors. Prized for several thousand years in antiquity, all yellow gems in antiquity were called topaz. Often confused with citrine quartz (yellow) and smoky quartz (brown), quartz and topaz are separate and unrelated mineral species. The most prized color of topaz is called Imperial topaz after the Russian Czars of the 1800s and features a magnificent orange body color with pinkish undertones. Topaz also comes in yellow, pink, purple, orange, and the many popular blue tones....

Jewelry Insurance Appraisals

Jewelry Appraisals Are your most precious treasures insured? At Frederic Owen Fine Jewelry Mark O. Berman, proprietor and G.I.A. Graduate Jeweler Gemologist will appraise your jewelry while you wait. Make an appointment or stop in on one of our appraisal days. What exactly is an appraisal? An appraisal is a document that verifies the facts about your jewelry purchase. It’s different from the diamond grading report you received from your jeweler. A diamond grading report will tell you everything you need to know about your diamond (size, weight, color, & cutting). The jewelry appraisal assigns a value to your entire ring, so it takes the diamond (and other stones) as well as the metal into consideration. Why get an appraisal? Think of an appraisal as a souped-up receipt in case anything happens to your jewelry. You’ll need it in order to get insurance or if you’re adding a rider to cover your ring, bands etc. on your homeowners insurance policy or an independent jewelry policy. It will also give you proof you can use to claim your ring if it’s stolen and recovered by police. When should you get one? If you just purchased your wedding rings, we recommend getting it done as early as possible just in case something happens to your rings. At Frederic Owen Fine Jewelry we have your wedding ring appraisal complete at pick up time! As for individual items or estate jewelry appraising, we will schedule an appointment at your convenience. How does it work? The diamond appraisal would be done in front of you or upon take-in. How much does it cost? At...
Blog October Opal

Blog October Opal

Opal is known for its unique display of flashing rainbow colors called play-of-color. There are two broad classes of opal: precious and common. Precious opal displays play-of-color, common opal does not. We have a beautiful pear shaped precious opal pendant set in 14kt white gold as seen here. This opal gives off a beautiful arrangement of color.   We currently have a precious pair of round opal stud earrings with diamond accents set in 14kt white gold. Visit our portfolio or stop in our store. It is reported in the Austrailian legends that the creator came down to Earth on a rainbow, in order to bring the message of peace to all the humans. And at the very spot, where his foot touched the ground, the stones became alive and started sparkling in all the colors of the rainbow. That was the birth of the...
Wedding Bands

Wedding Bands

HISTORY The wedding ring is the most recognized symbol of the unification of a man and woman in marriage. This symbol can be traced way back in time originating from North Africa among the ancient Egyptian civilization. They would twist and braid pieces of nature, such as leaves and bushes, and wrap them around fingers like rings or wrists as bracelets.They wore it on the third finger of the left hand because they believed that a vein in that particular finger traveled directly to the heart. This legend was then passed onto the Greeks and the Romans.Back then, hemp was usually the first choice of material for the wedding ring, but this material usually only lasted about a year. Those who desired a longer lasting material opted for leather, bone or ivory.In modern times we use precious metals such as gold or platinum as a symbol of marriage. SIGNIFICANCE The ring is circular, a symbol of eternity. The circle is a shape that was worshiped by Egyptians and many other ancient cultures in the form of the sun and the moon. The space inside the circle is not just empty—it represents a doorway leading towards the unknown future.The ring started to be associated with love, in the hope that love itself could become like the circle and live on for an eternity. TYPES Most religious marriage ceremonies accept any material for the wedding band. Jewelers typically use a precious alloy of fine gold, combined with copper,silver,aluminum and zinc to make the specific color metal of your choice. In addition Platinum offers an everlasting metal to represent the symbol of...